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Microsoft Translator brings natural translation to wearables

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At Microsoft, we focus on bringing new product innovations to our customers in all forms. Today, the Microsoft Translator team has leveraged the same engine behind Skype Translator and Office programs to bring a powerful translation feature to conversations on Android and iOS wearables. Now you can translate conversations between English, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish on your wearables.

The Microsoft Translator pairs an Android or iOS device with an Android Wear or Apple Watch respectively. Individuals then speak into their wearable device and receive a translation on their phone, which then can be handed to another person, who can continue the dialogue—creating natural, translated conversation. Don’t have a wearable device with you? No worries; you can still enjoy the experience using just a phone, but the experience truly shines with a paired combo of a phone and wearable device.

Check out this short animation to see a demo of the product:

Interested? Download the apps here:

You can find more information here from the Translator team.

You can also test drive the same engine that powers the feature in Word Online to translate Word and PDF documents, as well as in Word, Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Publisher and Visio desktop apps!

For more apps powered by the Microsoft Translator visit www.microsofttranslator.com/apps.

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1 comments
  1. This is a great concept and very practical. I’m sure it’s already been considered, but the potential applications and sales opportunities are tremendous. The technology would be an invaluable tool for firefighters, medics, law enforcement, emergency room, nursing staff, and personnel in high profile security positions such as airline attendants, airport security, military personnel etc. and last indigenous groups like Native Americans could use it as a tool to preserve language and culture…..just a thought.

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