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Garage Series: Power BI and Excel takes on El Clásico

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This week the Garage Series comes from Barcelona, Spain on the heels of TechEd Europe. In this demo-packed show Jeremy puts the advanced analytics and visuals in Excel and Power BI to the test to expose data patterns within past matches between Real Madrid and FC Barcelona. By combining historical El Clásico and player data, outside forces like temperature, humidity and moon phases, Jeremy tries to predict the outcomes and puts these predictions to the test among fans in Barcelona.

Last November we invited Michael Tejedor to the Garage to give a first look at Power BI. This week, we hit the road again and while at TechEd Barcelona, and we decided to put Power BI to the test and see if we could combine multiple data sources and use the visualization engines in Excel and Power BI in an attempt to predict the outcome of El Clásico after hearing from fans of both clubs.  The nice thing with a scenario like this is that detailed data is easily available via sources like Wikipedia, but using Power Query in Excel we can mash up external data keying off dates and geographical locations to bring in things like temperature, humidity and even moon phases to see if any of these things has an impact on the matches between Real Madrid and FC Barcelona.

In this show we take a look at several technologies in the latest Excel and Power BI:

powermap

Q&A

powerbi

timeline

 

Regardless of the data you’re using, you can model everything in Excel with all of the data slicers and visuals then via simple drag and drop add your Excel file into Power BI. Once your files are loaded into Power BI, its easy to add them into the Q&A engine simply by right-clicking and adding the file into Q&A. With everything loaded into Power BI, people can view and interact with the data directly from the browser – no need to have the latest version of Office installed or a powerful computer to run it. All the compute is actually running in the Power BI service. It’s pretty amazing.

Now if you’re wondering how it turned out, the images above show just how close the teams and players are matched. You may have watched El Clásico a few weeks back and know who won, but you’ll have to check out the show to see how well Power BI, Excel and our disparate data did to help predict a few outcomes.

See you next week!

Jeremy Chapman

More resources

Power BI for Office 365

Unleashing Power BI for Office 365 Garage Series show

Garage Series Video Channel

Garage Series Season 1 Blog Archive

Follow @OfficeGarage on Twitter

Office 365 Garage Series Apps for Windows Phone and Windows 8

About the Garage Series hosts

By day, Jeremy Chapman works at Microsoft, responsible for optimizing the future of Office client and service delivery as the senior deployment lead. Jeremy’s background in application compatibility, building deployment automation tools and infrastructure reference architectures has been fundamental to the prioritization of new Office enterprise features such as the latest Click-to-Run install. By night, he is a car modding fanatic and serial linguist.

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3 comments
    • Jeremy Chapman
      Microsoft.com User">

      Thanks Sean! Power Map is awesome and always getting even better. The BI tools are pretty amazing between Excel and Power BI. Thanks for helping spread the word with your blog.

  1. fantastic! where we can download the excel sheet I like to use in my training to users

    Thanks,
    Yousef

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