Word

Change the default line spacing in Word

When the default line spacing in documents changed from single spacing in Word 2003 to a slightly roomier 1.15 spacing in Word 2007 and Word 2010, customers asked the inevitable: Why did the default line spacing change? And how do I change it back? The short answer is that the default line spacing changed in Word 2007 to make online documents more readable. If you want to change the default line spacing in Word…

Word

Tip: How to cut and paste without messing up formatting

Why does formatting sometimes get messed up when you cut and paste text? And what is that thing that appears at the end of the last sentence every time you paste-like a fly returning to honey. That thing–the Paste Options button–is your friend, a worker bee and not a fly whose only job is to follow your formatting instructions. Learning how it works keeps you from wasting time manually formatting…

Word

Use cross-references to link to other parts of a document

You’ve heard that cross-references can enhance the professional quality of a research paper. What are cross-references and how do they work? A cross-reference is a pointer or link to an item that is in another location in a document – for example, “See Figure 1″ to link to a salient graphic. You can create cross-references to headings, footnotes, bookmarks, captions, and numbered paragraphs.  

Word

Understanding images: Part 3 – Anchoring

Why do figures, or images, sometimes jump to a different page in your Word document? This is one of the great mysteries of Word and today, I’ll reveal the answer. To get to the bottom of this question, it’s important to understand the concept of anchoring. Every floating figure in a Word document is actually attached to the page. This point of attachment is called the “anchor” and is indicated by…

Word

Understanding images: Part 2 – Wrapping styles

Wrapping text around figures, also known as graphic objects or images, can help give your documents a more polished look and help focus attention on the most important content. Last week, I wrote about the basics of inline vs. floating figures. One of the big differences between these types of images is that floating images are positioned separately from the text, allowing text to wrap around, over, and behind the images.…

Word

Understanding images: Part 1 – The basics

Figures can add a ton of pizazz to a document, but they don’t always behave the way you might expect, which can be incredibly frustrating. With a little behind the scenes information, you can put your figures in their place. Theresa Estrada, a program manager on the Word team, writes today about the basics of working with graphic objects–shapes, text boxes, pictures, and more. This is the first of a…