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Introducing Access 2013

Access 2013The Access team is proud to introduce the Access 2013 public preview, which will make it easier than ever for everyday people to organize the data in their lives and businesses using Access apps. On this blog, you’ll be able to learn about the improvements included in this new release.

Access has always been a great tool to help you organize and run a small business or a team. This release focuses on bringing Access databases to the web, making them more useful than ever. Your database can be hosted by Microsoft through Office 365 and securely accessed from any tablet or computer—even if the device doesn’t have Access installed.

Getting started is easier, too, taking just 60 seconds to get your first Access app up and running. With little or no additional effort, you’ll end up with a finished app that is both functional and beautiful—automatically—thanks to an enhanced user interface. Finally, we’ve made some big improvements under the covers to make your apps faster and more extensible. Your data is now stored in a full-fledged SQL Server database. When Microsoft hosts your database in the cloud, we’ll use SQL Azure; when you host it yourself on your network, you can use SQL Server 2012. Advanced users will love the fact that they can directly connect to SQL Server with familiar tools for powerful analysis and integration.

Here’s a peek of some of the things we’ll be talking about:

Host your databases in the cloud with Office 365

Create a new Access 2013 web app with Office 365.If your Office 365 plan includes SharePoint, you can host Access 2013 databases with no extra setup required. Microsoft will make sure your data is secure, backed-up, and available, so that you can focus on getting things done. You can try it out by signing up for a preview of Office 365 Small Business Premium or Office 365 Enterprise. Whether you’re a small business or a large corporation, you’ll be able to harness the power of Access 2013 in the cloud simply and easily. Of course, companies also have the option of hosting databases themselves by installing SharePoint 2013 and SQL Server 2012 on their own network.

Get started faster

Add tables using templates.Search from a library of table templates to help you track the people, things, events, or tasks that you care about. Each table template comes with fields, views, relationships, and data-integrity rules, so you can take advantage of all the great features of Access 2013 with a single click. It’s easy to combine different table templates into a single app or tweak an existing table by adding or removing fields. You’ll get to spend your time customizing your database to meet your  unique needs instead of worrying about repetitive details.

A polished, professional user interface for your apps

A clean, professional user interface.Whether you use table templates, import existing data, or define your own schema from scratch, Access 2013 will provide your database with a great user interface automatically. Without any effort on your part, Access will generate views for your data, including a searchable list view and an Excel-like datasheet. Buttons to navigate between your views and tables come for free, too.  If you have related datalike Invoices and Line ItemsAccess will automatically create views that show these items together, allowing you to drill-through to get more details. Of course, everything is still customizable, but now you can focus on what’s unique about your app. 

Access apps = SharePoint apps

Add Access apps to SharePoint using the App CatalogueAccess 2013 web databases work great with SharePoint 2013, which has been enhanced in this release with apps for SharePoint. Because an Access app is just like any other SharePoint app, it’s easy to deploy, manage, and share securely. There are no additional passwords or logins to juggle because security is controlled through the same infrastructure. Users can discover and share Access apps through the public SharePoint App Store or a private App Catalogue. Installing an app takes just a few clicks. Corporate IT can control everything centrally using familiar SharePoint tools. Best of all, anyone with a web browser and an internet connection can use your app, even if he doesn’t have Access installed on his device.

SQL Server back-end

One of the biggest improvements in Access 2013 is one you may not even noticeexcept that you’re whole app will be faster, more reliable, and work great with large amounts of data. When Access databases are published to SharePointwhether on-premise or through Office 365a full-fledged SQL Server database is automatically created to store the data. Advanced users who are already familiar with SQL Server will be able to directly connect to this database for advanced reporting and analysis with familiar tools such as Excel, Power View, and Crystal Reports. Everyday users can rest assured that their apps are ready for the future if they ever need to enhance them with advanced integrations or migrations. Check out the Access 2013 developer center for more details.

 Access on Office 365 harnesses the power of SQL Azure.

We’re looking forward to introducing you to what’s amazing and new about Access 2013. Stay tuned!

Join the conversation

74 comments
  1. Will the Access 2013 database size limit be larger than 2 GB?

    • This would be very great :) We are a buinsess solution devloper company.

    • There is no change in the size limits of desktop databases. Desktop databases are the ones that you can create using older versions that store the data on your computer in .mdb or .accdb files.

      For 2013 Web Databases–the ones that are hosted on the web through SharePoint and SQL Server–there are different constraints depending on what your setup is:

      1. If you deploy SharePoint 2013 and SQL 2012 to your own corporate network, databases can be (practically) as large as you’d like. You’re limited only by the technical and performance constraints of SQL Server and whatever hardware you have.
      2. If your databases are hosted in the cloud through Office365, there is (for now) a 1 GB cap.

      We’ll be covering more details about how to deal with large databases in future posts.

    • Microsoft ignored the users request about this database size limitation. I have been requesting this since Office 2000 but nothing change about this limitation.

  2. Looking forward to the new features of Access 2013 – really like the new polished, professional user interface. Just hoping that the database size limit will be larger too.

  3. I can’t get any of the Beta downloads to work – either the normal DL or the MSI download.
    All I get once I enter the info and click to go to the downlaod page is a group of circling green dots and nothing else ever happens. Is it the DL site or my login/account that’s messed up?

  4. Will access be included in the suite for mac users? Why doesn’t Microsoft think mac users need access?

    • One of the great things about Access 2013 Web Databases is that they can be used on any platform — mac or windows.

      The Access 2013 client software, which only available on windows, is necessary to design and customize your Access 2013 web database. However, a web browser (Mac or Windows) is all you need to use a database that has already been designed. So if you’re a business that has some Mac computers, there are two ways to take advantage of web databases:

      1. If you have at least one windows PC, use this computer to do the design/customization work. The Macs will still be able to use the resulting database to enter and view data.
      2. Download pre-built template databases from the SharePoint App Store. If someone has already created a database for what you want to track, you can use it on any platform without even touching the Access 2013 client software.

  5. So are there any other significant changes to Access beyond the back-end upgrades?

    • There are ton of improvements besides to the front-end, too. We’ll be diving into these in future posts. A few of the big items were mentioned in the post: (1) Access now takes care of lots of repetitive design tasks for you. It handles navigation between views, search, and the initial creation of list and datasheet views (2) table templates make it really easy to get started quickly.

  6. @ariaofgrace – There is no change in the size limits of desktop databases. Desktop databases are the ones that you can create using older versions that store the data on your computer in .mdb or .accdb files.

    For 2013 Web Databases–the ones that are hosted on the web through SharePoint and SQL Server–there are different constraints depending on what your setup is:

    1. If you deploy SharePoint 2013 and SQL 2012 to your own corporate network, databases can be (practically) as large as you’d like. You’re limited only by the technical and performance constraints of SQL Server and whatever hardware you have.
    2. If your databases are hosted in the cloud through Office365, there is (for now) a 1 GB cap.

    We’ll be covering more details about how to deal with large databases in future posts.

    • Andrew,

      Are you telling me that the size limitation still exists? I manipulate a lot of data and in most cases the I have reach the 2 GB limit. I even have several applications that has almost 1GB of data and i’m worried that this new version can’t address my need. So do you mean that I can’t utilize the SQL-Server that came with Access 2013 for me to use for my back-end data to address the size limitation? Please advise.

      • Robert,

        When you wrote of "the SQL-Server that came with access 2013," I’m not sure I know what you mean. To clarify, SQL Server 2012 is a separate product. If you run it yourself on your own servers, you can use it to store the back-end data for a front-end Access desktop database (.mdb or .accdb). In this configuration, you can make databases of practically any size (if you set up your SQL Server machine to handle it). If you have a subscription to Office 365, Microsoft will provision SQL Azure databases for you when you create a new Access 2013 Web database on your SharePoint Online site. You could also, if you wanted to, build a desktop access database and connect to this SQL Azure database for back-end data storage. A 1GB cap currently applies to SQL Azure databases that are provisioned in this way. (You could directly pay for a SQL Azure database yourself, and no such limit would apply).

        You are correct, though, that the 2GB limit for traditional desktop databases that store data using JET still exists in Access 2013.

    • I don’t intend to use sharepoint and all I want to know if the SQL-Server for Access 2013 can be utilized as my back-end database on our network for mutli-user access. Or i’m still stuck with that limitation?

      • Robert. I’m not exactly sure what you mean by "the SQL Server for Access 2013." I’ll take a stab at clarifying, but if I’ve missed the mark, let me know.

        There are two kinds of databases that you can make in Access 2013. (1) Traditional desktop databases where you need to use the client program to run them and (2) web databases that you publish to sharepoint.

        Web databases use SQL server as a back-end storage. If you run your own SharePoint 2013 and SQL Server 2012 servers, these databases can be as large as you’d like. If you host them through Office 365, there is currently a 1GB cap

        Desktop databases come in two flavors: those that store the data in in the local file (manged by the Jet database engine), and those that store the data on a SQL server using linked tables. Jet databases have had a 2GB limit in the past. This is unchanged in this release. SQL server linked table databases have in the past only been limited by the SQL Server constraints. This means that if you have the full version of SQL Server and powerful hardware running on your own network, they could practically get as large as you’d like. This is also unchanged in this release. There is no special verson of SQL server that is provided by Access 2013. When you use Access 2013 web database, you are taking advantages of a SQL Server that is being hosted by microsoft or one you’ve set up yourself.

        You seem to be most interested in desktop databases. If you find yourself running into the 2gb jet database limit, and you’re not interested in the new web databases, I’d encourage you to consider moving your data to SQL and using linked tables to expose it in Access.

        • I won’t be using Access as a web database. I won’t be using sharepoint at all., just plain access on the front end and SQL-server at the back end if SQL-Server will come with Access 2013. In the past i’m strictly limited with Jet database.

        • Andrew,

          I used Access only and I’m only interested if you guys can address the database limitation. i usually split the database front-end and back-end. The back end contains only tables and it resides on our local server. front end is linked to that. This is how i’m setup. The database size is always a problem and we are not moving to SQL-Server. do you guys have planned to increase the database size?

        • Andrew, Please address the 2 GB limit for the desktop database. We are not interested in moving to SQL Server. I’m pretty sure a lot of users have been requesting for this limitation to be remove or at least increased by ten-fold.

  7. @James Rivera – Access 2013 Web Databases should work with both the Enterprise and Small Business Premium preview accounts on Office 365. If you’re having trouble with the default publish locations, one thing to try might be to copy the URL of your SharePoint Team Site site into the "Web Location" field in Access 2013. That URL will look something like this:

    https://mybusiness.sharepoint.com/_layouts/15/start.aspx

    If you’re using a Small Business Premium preview account, you can find your own site’s URL by going to "Sites" in the blue navigation bar, then clicking "Team Site."

    We’ll be covering all the details about how to get started quickly in a future post.

  8. It’s good to hear that the database will bigger given that it will use SQL-Server as the back end database. I use a lot of data for payroll analysis and I usually have back end database using Access but the 2GB limit have short live that. This is good news but on the other hand I would have to learn SQL-Server. I guess trade off is not bad considering the big gain….Looking forward for this…..I have been requesting the database about the database size limit since 2000.

  9. @somefreetime – One of the great things about Access 2013 Web Databases is that they can be used on any platform — mac or windows.

    The Access 2013 client software, which only available on windows, is necessary to design and customize your Access 2013 web database. However, a web browser (Mac or Windows) is all you need to use a database that has already been designed. So if you’re a business that has some Mac computers, there are two ways to take advantage of web databases:

    1. If you have at least one windows PC, use this computer to do the design/customization work. The Macs will still be able to use the resulting database to enter and view data.
    2. Download pre-built template databases from the SharePoint App Store. If someone has already created a database for what you want to track, you can use it on any platform without even touching the Access 2013 client software.

  10. Access 2013 Web Databases should work with both the Enterprise and Small Business Premium preview accounts on Office 365. If you’re having trouble with the default publish locations, one thing to try might be to copy the URL of your SharePoint Team Site site into the "Web Location" field in Access 2013. That URL will look something like this:

    https://mybusiness.sharepoint.com/_layouts/15/start.aspx

    If you’re using a Small Business Premium preview account, you can find your own site’s URL by going to "Sites" in the blue navigation bar, then clicking "Team Site."

    We’ll be covering all the details about how to get started quickly in a future post.

  11. 1. Did you fix old bugs from previous versions of Access?
    2. A2007 was not fully compatible with previous versions of Access. Is A2013 fully compatible with A2007?
    3. Can I use A2013 with Team Foundation Server 2010?
    4. A2007 & TFS2010 produce too many bugs. Does A2013 treat complex queries correctly? Especially in connection with TFS.
    5. A2007 is unbelievably slow under TFS 2010. Did you improve A2013 performance?
    6. Are there any enhancements in the old fashioned SQL-editor? Well, in fact, there’s no SQL-editor in previous versions of Access. It’s just a simple ASCII editor. :-( 7. Is database size limit > 2GB in A2013?
    8. Did you enhance PDW in A2013?
    9. Does new PDW correctly treat ActiveX?
    10. Does new PDW correctly treat nested folders?

  12. There are some problems with signing in. I’m signed in as VladimirC (VladimirCvajniga), but my post is under Anonymous user.

    I’m missing an option to edit my existing post(s).

  13. Andrew Stegmaier said:
    "Desktop databases are the ones that you can create using older versions that store the data on your computer in .mdb or .accdb files"

    Can you please clarify the point above? Does it follow from the above sentence that in order to create an .mdb or an .accdb file one must use an older version of Access? What about the issue of hybrid applications? These have been described here in previous blogs dealing with Access 07 and 10. Is that still an option or is Access 2013 strictly for creating Web applications and Web applications only? Where does VBA fit in?

    • Gilad – Thanks for pointing out the ambiguity.

      Access 2013 can create desktop databases just like previous versions could. Also what I wrote above about desktop datases "storing the data on your computer" is not true in all cases. You’re right to point out that previous versions could have the data stored in SQL through linked tables and only use the .accdb file for keeping the forms, queries, and reports. That funcitonality is also still supported in Access 2013.

    • ADP (Access Data Pages) files are not supported in Access 2013. We’ll have more details on what this means and how affected customers can work around this in a future post.

      • Acces Data Projects i guess..

  14. Maybe I’m missing omething here. There doesn’t seem to be anything new for the "desktop database" developer.

    I’d love to develop for a Web UI. For home, where I use Access more than any other App save MS Money, it’d be handy for makng the data available to my mobile, Android, devices and my Mac. But there’s no way to do that but use, and pay for, one of the "small business" Off365 services. At work, it would be great, but our IT evironment will let "users" put this kind of stuff on their (backlevel anyway) SharePoint about the time h*** freezes over. They aren’t into user empowerement. Their modus operandi is more one of user supression and avoidance. We’re their worst nightmare. (We still run WinXP and have to beg to get Off07.) So I muddle by with .mdb and .accdb.

    PLEASE don’t abandon us downtrodden "desktop database" developers.

    • Dick – Access 2013 and SharePoint 2013 combine to give enterprises a good deal more manageability for their Access apps. Expect future posts to cover this in detail. We think that once companies get used to the idea of SharePoint apps, allowing their users to take advantage of the power of Access web apps will be a no-brainier. To your second point, we’re not abandoning desktop databases–they’re supported in 2013.

      • I guess that’s one thing that always frustrates me about Microsoft. You guys have drunk so much of your own bathwater that you really believe that customer companies want to be like you and gain the advantages you have with all of this neato technology you develop. They don’t. Or at least a lot of them don’t. And your own data on migration to new stuff vs. continued use of the old stuff–Off03, WinXP, etc., should show how prevalent this is out there. Companies like mine have had a decade to "get used to the idea of SharePoint apps." They haven’t. "No-brainer?" That’s giving many of these corporate IT groups way too much credit.

        And yes, it appears you haven’t "abandoned" desktop databases in the sense that they still open and operate. But I can’t find one single thing that you’ve done in Access 2013 for the desktop database user/developer. Am I missing something? Did you do anything in this release that benefits us? Some of my queries/lookup fileds break for no explicable reason. Beyond that? I’m not seeing any upside in Access2013. Try though I might.

        • Yes I think you are missing something: the revenue that Microsoft is hoping to receive. You wrote that your company has been using 2003 for a decade. Imagine how much $ your company would have payed if it would have been using Office365 all this time in order to use Access+Sharpoint+SqlSever. If I am not mistaken the current cost for this package is 20$ a month (correct me if I am wrong). That accumulates to a lot of money. I think it is fair to make the comparison between these two alternative options. If you compare the web database with 365 and the previous desktop version I think the 365 online will be much more expensive in the long run. I think that it is expensive even if the monthly price doesn’t sound like it is a lot. And if you decide to install Sharepoint server and SqlServer locally the prices are even more deterring. Microsoft has every right to try and increase their profit. We all do that and it is perfectly acceptable. But costumers also have a right to try and figure out their costs and expenses.

  15. Hi Andrew,

    I’ve been an Access developer since 1996 and I have developed databases consistently on pretty much every job I’ve been since. I’m looking forward to convincing my current employer that using SharePoint to host web Access databases is a sound investment but that could actually take some time while I navigate the political waters of the IT hierarchy :)

    While I understand that the cloud is the way to go in the future – that will take some time. In the meantime, we still need to keep focusing on desktop solutions.

    The main question I have for you here is about desktop solutions and, in particular, what has been done to improve mdb or accdb front-end access to SQL back-ends. As you know, if you have worked with Access for a while within enterprise environments, the pinnacle of Access programming is finally reached when you leave your Jet databases behind for a more robust and scalable system in SQL Server.

    Furthermore, I think you can obtain the best juice out of Access if you combine the following:

    - MDB or ACCDB front-end
    - Local tables inside the front-end accessed through DAO
    - Passthrough queries running store procs in the SQL Server through ODBC
    - Opening ADO recordsets to manipulate specific data in SQL Server
    - Unbound forms (no form is bound to a back-end table but you can bind to a local populated table)

    In my opinion, the combination of all the above is the best current solution set for high-end enterprise Access databases. The problem with the above, however, is that it requires a lot of upfront design, and the code can get really cumbersome if you are trying to do too much.

    Now, going back to my question: has anything been done in Access 2013 to address any of the items above? As you can imagine, in order to use all of the above you need to know DAO, ADO, ODBC, and be fairly experienced in form manipulation and Access VBA. What I was expecting to see (and hopefully I’m not dissapointed) is a lot more support for Unbound forms. If your team adds conclusive ADO support to Unbound forms then this could be a real winner. I think support for ADO in Unbound forms to SQL server can be enhanced by adding form properties to manage handshake and set up, thus eliminating all the code you need to write in order to set up the connection and pass all the parameters, etc. That’s just an idea.

    I hope my question is clear enough – sorry for the wall text but I’m very interested in your answer to this.

    Thank you,

    Nelson Gonzalez

  16. What about back-end password? She is still visible in the table MSysObjects?
    No use having password in the backend, because you can easily find the password …
    For that matter, will be either no change?

    • Marcelo. You can get round this problem programmatically. Set up your front end – back end link prior to setting a database password on the back end. Then add the back end database password. Now, whenever, you open the front end, open a persistent connection, e.g. using OpenDatabase with the database password supplied in the connection details. Your front end tables can now be opened as normal, without needing to supply the database password any more and there is no database password in any system tables.

      • Alan. Very grateful for the response. Did I see any examples?

  17. Loved the SQL Server and Access Integration, however disappointed to see no way to make VBA work in web apps.. Would have loved to see some or the other way to make custom vba code run in the browser or atleast it been implemented as a remote app service..

  18. Some great announcements here and congrats to the Access team.

    It sounds like the only way to publish Access to the Web is to host it on SharePoint, is this correct or can an app be published as a stand-alone web app?

    Being able to build a stand-alone web app using my 15 years of Access experience would be a game changer for me.

    • Richard – You’re correct that Access 2013 web apps require SharePoint (and SQL Server). For people that need to build stand-alone apps, the traditional desktop apps are still supported.

  19. Hi, I’d like to get an answer to my question below. Thank you.

    Nelson Gonzalez

  20. There is zero new features in Access 2013 for desktop developers.
    In fact some features such as Form Pivot Views have been removed.
    So no point in updating from 2010 unless you want to create web applications in which case LightSwitch is more advanced than Access 2013 and may be the better choice
    I tested creating a web application and was able to import small tables but the first large table the import keeps falling over.
    Also, it appears it does not import table relationships so unlike LightSwitch automatically creating a textbox with the lookup value for lists and replacing the textbox with a combo box when editing.

    It is a bit amateurish of the Microsoft Office team to release the preview without any real documentation.

    • Yes, I agree that this version does not really address the database size for desktop developers at all and we’ve been asking for this change since 2000. We are not interested in using SQL because of the workgroup model and definitely not interest in sharepoint either…

  21. Hi Andrew

    Does it cross the VBA to VBScript / JavaScript, HTML5 !!!

    • Access 2013 web databases have both UI Macros (which get translated into JavaScript on browsers) and Data Macros (which get translated into T-SQL in the server). These two technologies allow you to do many of the things that once required VBA.

      You can continue to use VBA for your desktop database apps, however, which are supported in Access 2013.

  22. Will we be able to use a OData service as an editable data source in Access? OData is said to be the web/cloud equivalent of ODBC, and can now be viewed/analysed with Excel with PowerPivot, so this would give Access a new dimension.

  23. As an adp/sql server developer I am very dissapointed the new version does not allow any adp’s anymore. I have, and will not have, any attention to develop web services neither using sharepoint as access adp’s with sql server are very powerfull tools and sincerely hope the microsoft office team will re-consider this.

  24. @ anonymous – I am sorry our direction with ADPs does not fit your situation. The decision was made based on the very low usage of ADPs combined with the very high cost of migrating it to newer versions of SQL Server. The reality is we have seen ever decreasing usage of ADPs as more capable devs such as your self have migrated to HTML and Mobile platforms.

    Todd Haugen – GPM MS Access

  25. @ Finlay – I am sorry you are having problems importing large tables, we tested tables with millions of rows so it is likely not failing on volume but rather some data type mismatch in the data itself. If you are willing to send us your database we would love to debug it. As for not importing relationships, it depends on how those relationships were made. If you used lookups they are brought in, if not it is very fast to convert them to lookups so we can bring them in. If you bring them in we generate all of the drill through you could want, far more than LightSwitch so it may be worth your time to work through the initial hurdles.

    If you ant to engage on your database let us know and we will figure out how to connect.

    Todd Haugen – GPM MS Access

    • Hi Todd,
      I am trying to import an Sqlserver database so relationships defined in Sqlserver.

      Thanks for the tip I will import from Sqlserver to Access 2010 with lookups then into 2013.

      (1) Will developers be able to get full access to the Sqlserver database either through Access or Sqlserver management studio?
      (2) Will stored procedures be supported?
      (3) Will we be able to link to rather than importing existing sqlserver databases.

      If I still have problems importting tables via access 2010 I will take up your kind offer to look at our data.

      Thanks for your support,
      Finlay McMillan

      • Finaly – There is a simple answer to your first question: Yes, developers will be able to directly connect to the SQL Server/SQL Azure database that is the back-end of an Access 2013 web database.

        There will be a post very soon that should go a long way towards answering your more in-depth questions.

  26. Haven’t had time to play with the preview yet unfortunately.
    1) Is there a reasonable upgrade path from Access 2010 web databases to Access 2013 web databases, please?
    2) Is it still possible to have a "mixed" database, i.e. client front end using Sharepoint tables, thus retaining the power of Access client forms, VBA and so on while getting the reach available by using web tables?

    • Alan –

      To answer your questions in order:

      1) If you import an existing Access 2010 web database into an Access 2013 web database, you’ll find that your data structure (including relationships) is reproduced. Access will generate a clean, functional user interface around this data structure. Custom logic and forms may have to be re-written. We found, however, that 90% of the code people were writing in old databases was all doing the same thing: navigation, adding/deleting records, and showing related data. Since we now take care of that for you, we think this will go a long way to making the transition.

      Access 2010 web database are still supported, however, so if you don’t want to upgrade to the new model, you can use Access 2013 to edit and maintain your existing Access 2010 web databases.

      2) In Access 2013, you can continue to use and edit existing "mixed" databases (that you describe above) that were created in Access 2010. If you want to take advantage of Access 2013 web databases combined with the power of the traditional Access desktop client, there is a way to do it, but it is different than in 2010. After you build an Access 2013 web database, you can directly connect to the SQL back-end using a traditional desktop database. You could, for example, use this desktop database to create powerful printed reports. We even make this easy to do–you’ll find a link in the program to "create reporting database"–which automatically sets up a desktop database with the correct connection information to SQL Server/Azure.

      We’ll be covering this technique more in-depth in future posts.

  27. @ Crispin – Sorry to say we dod not get to enable support for O Data at RTM. This is a key area we are looking at for the next release. In the near-term SQL Azure will be turning on ODBC access which will allow you to hook Excel and PowerPivot together with Access. This feature will be available by RTM.

    Todd Haugen – GPM MS Access

  28. @ Dick – We have no intention of abandoning our client roots. This release was focused on continuing the addition of web application authoring to Access we started last release. This came at the cost of major investments in the client but should not be interpreted as a long term move away from the Access client.

    Todd Haugen – GPM MS Access

  29. Hi Todd,

    Could you please elaborate on enhancements to desktop applications support in 2013? I’m specifically interested in unbound forms clients to SQL server backends for ADO and ODBC technologies.

    Thank you for your time

  30. As I continue testing the preview it appears that attaching to SharePoint 2010 Lists is not supported but importing them is.

    Attachment fields are not supported in the import process.

    Why can’t the Office team put out a document explaining what is supported.

    • Finlay – Details about external data in Access 2013 web databases will definitely be something we’ll be covering in-depth in future posts.

  31. Could you please elaborate on enhancements to desktop applications support in 2013? I’m specifically interested in unbound forms clients to SQL server backends for ADO and ODBC technologies.

    Thank you for your time

  32. Andrew,
    Thanks for the reply about web databases. Sounds really good.

  33. Hi Todd,

    I am very dissapointed no support will be given on adp’s. I am an access/sql developer respresenting over 1500 employees in the company I am working for, all using adp’s (ade’s) for different purposes such product workflow, orderings and marketing/sales information and I tried to work with ‘pass through queries’, but, they do not support @parameters, which we use in thousands of stored procedures so hope you can take this in consideration.

    Cees Monden

  34. Love the SQL Server Azure and Access Integration, coolio …

  35. Will it be possible to create a Hybrid application like 2010. I have not seen how. Need to use client views on the desktop and create web forms as well. Does anyone have information about this

    • It appears from other blogs that two database files are required. One Web and the other client. PLease confirm

    • Access 2013 web apps use a different architecture than 2010 web databases. Hybrid applications are possible, but not in the same way as before. The views/forms that you design for a 2013 web app live on the server only. (You design them in the Access 2013 client, but to use them, you need to open your app in the browser). If you want to take advantage of VBA, reporting and other advanced features of desktop databases, you need to create a separate desktop database and connect it to the SQL Server/SQL Azure database that stores the data from your 2013 web app.

      This is different from the way things are with 2010 web databases. In that version, web-based features (forms, reports, queries, etc) could live side-by-side in the same database with client-only features (vba code, advanced forms). You can still open and edit your 2010 web databases with Access 2013, though.

      • Andrew said: "If you want to take advantage of VBA, reporting and other advanced features of desktop databases, you need to create a separate desktop database and connect it to the SQL Server/SQL Azure database that stores the data from your 2013 web app."

        What about Jet databases? can they still be used for linked tables in desktop apps?

  36. Are there any resources out there related to developing Windows 8 apps for the Store using Access 2013 and VS 2012? I am also interested in resources for using Bing Map services with Access 2013 without ArcGIS. Thanks.

  37. Please bring back Access Forms Pivot-Table and Pivot-Chart. For buisness apps very necessary.

    THANKS

    • I was also disappointed that Charts and Pivot Tables were not supported by Access Services in Access 2010, and can’t believe that they are still not available in Access 2013.
      I can see great potential in SharePoint and Access 2013, but without Graphs, it’s not much use within a business environment, unless you just want data entry, and basic reports.
      Come-on Microsoft pull your finger out!

  38. We have developed a ADP application for sql server over the last 8 years.
    Is it true that Access2013 does not support ADP’s?
    Is ist true that SQL Server 2012 does nor support ADP’s from Access 2010?
    Wat can we do to make our (very very big) Application sustainable ?

  39. I am disappointed pivot tables are no longer supported that was a bit of shock.

    Did you guys get any feedback from the MVPs on that – I take it you chose to ignore it.

  40. I have n Access 2010 database and I would like to publish it as a SharePoint 2013 app. Is this possible? If so, what do I need to do to make it happen?

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