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Can’t remember all those Excel keyboard shortcuts? Now you don’t have to!

Find more "keyboard" images on Office.comToday’s blog post on keyboard shortcut reference cards is brought to you by Office.com writer, Turi Henderson. Turi has been on the Office.com team for a few years, writing mainly about Accessibility features and Language Tools, and periodically plying her coworkers with fine baked goods.

Keyboard shortcuts…

You use them every day to make your work flow smoothly, or – in some cases – to make your work flow, period. In all honesty, I use some of them so often that I have no idea where to find those functions on the ribbon! (Copy? Paste? Undo? I haven’t done those with a mouse in YEARS!) And I know I’m not alone. In the content that I manage, it is THE most popular subject, and generates the most feedback, with Excel users leading the charge.

There’s already a lovely article that talks about keyboard shortcuts in Excel 2010. It’s a fantastic resource, and has a lot of great information on what you can do just using your keyboard, but it’s quite long. It’s a lot of great information to scroll through to find what you need. So, in response to an overwhelming number of requests from you, Excel users, I’ve created some Quick Reference Cards – sheets, really – that you can download and save, or just print and keep near your workstation.

Keyboard shortcuts – Ctrl keys

Keyboard shortcuts – Function keys

Keyboard shortcuts – Miscellaneous

They look like this:

 Excel 2010 Keyboard Shortcut Quick Reference Card

You can also find them in the aforementioned lovely article, off to the side of each keyboard shortcut section:

Click the links on the right side of the article to download the quick reference card

Click the link, and the sheet will open as a PDF for you to save or print. They’re all two pages or fewer, so you can print double-sided onto a single sheet, if you like.

The plan is to have these for all Office products, eventually, but we’d love to know what you think about this first set before we do that. Are these helpful? How’s the formatting? Does it cover what you need? Let us know in the comments here, or through the article feedback!

 –Turi Henderson