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You asked about … watermarks

So many Office customers ask about watermarking that we’ve gathered the best answers here–links to our top instructions for using watermarks in Word, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Excel. (Excel doesn’t have an actual watermark feature, but you can still create watermarks in Excel using photos or words.)

Draft watermark 

Not sure what we mean by watermarks? Not to be confused with backgrounds, which fill the entire page, watermarks are usually ghosted words, such as DRAFT, COPYRIGHT, CONFIDENTIAL, or the company or creator’s name, placed on photos and documents. But watermarks can also be images, logos, or photos.

Customers not only want to use digital watermarks to stamp photos and documents, but also to use photos as watermarks. That’s one way to create your own stationery, for example. So we’ve included links for both, along with information about more traditional watermarking using text behind words.

Create a watermark for photos

If you’re trying to stamp photos with a copyright or other watermark using Word 2010, follow the three-step solution in my post on the Word Blog.

Copyright watermark

You can also find instructions for creating a digital watermark for a photo in PowerPoint in Add a watermark to a photo in PowerPoint and in Publisher in Add a watermark to a photo in Publisher.

A Publisher 2010 “Photo watermark” template by my colleague, Joannie Stangeland, makes adding a watermark to a photo in Publisher that much easier. When you download and open the template, you’ll see the instructions for using the template on the right-hand side.

Create a watermark using a photo

Photos and pictures can decorate or brand a document or worksheet. The steps for making a watermark from a photo, picture, or graphic are outlined for Excel 2010 in Mimic a watermark in Excel and for Word 2010 in Create a watermark from a picture.

 Image watermark

Check out the stationery and other watermarks templates on Office.com.

What about you? What do you want to know about watermarks? Have you tried creating your own?

Leslie H. Cole