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PivotTable Styles

Yesterday we looked at Table Styles.  Today, I wanted to revisit PivotTable Styles (see a post here where I introduced PivotTable styles a few months ago – you might want to re-read that before proceeding).  This post will be a bit shorter, because most of what I talked about yesterday with respect to Table Styles is also true for PivotTable Styles.

PivotTable Styles have the same design goals as Table Styles, and they also have the same user model and customization story.   Here is a shot of the PivotTable Design Tab where users can control the look of the PivotTable (the “Banded Columns†checkbox is a bug … it is supposed to be below the “Banded Rows†checkbox).


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The only real difference between the PivotTable and Table Styles is with regards to the number of elements in a PivotTable style.  Whereas Table Styles have 13 elements (headers, row banding, total rows, etc.), PivotTable styles have 25 elements.  The additional elements are due to the fact that PivotTables are more complex than tables, so there are more table elements available for users to define formatting on.  For example, you can define formatting for multiple levels of data, there are multiple levels of subtotals possible in a
PivotTable, etc.

With that said, I wanted to leave you with some examples of PivotTables formatted with different default Styles.  Again, I have tried to use a few of each of the Light, Medium, and Dark styles.  One thing to note that is quite different when compared to Table Styles is the use of colour and font to identify levels in the data.


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And, just for kicks, here is how a few of these styles look when converted to the “Opulent†Document Theme.


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Once again, we are interested to hear from the PivotTable users out there … do these look good, or are there things you would like to see us change?